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Well, well, well, what do we have here? A new streaming platform? Be still, our hearts! Watch these new Paramount Plus movies.

Check out these new and recent movies with your Paramount+ account

Well, well, well, what do we have here? A new streaming platform? Be still, our hearts! The streaming wars have left a pile of casualties (our wallets) as new services continue to snatch up any remaining content they can claim for themselves. The next step for the services? Shouting from the proverbial rooftops into the cyber-void, screaming: “pick me! For God’s sake, I am the platform to keep your troubles at bay! Pay for me!”

Paramount + is the new kid on the block, and audiences are intrigued. Paramount + has snatched up some killer TV titles exclusively, as fans contemplate what they’re willing to pay to watch The Real World & Inkmaster reruns (and for us, it’s quite a lot). 

However, Paramount movies are also on the table with the new platform, and the film selection is sweetening the deal more & more. Check out our fave Paramount movies available on Paramount + to help you decide the burning question: is Paramount + the platform of my dreams?

Citizen Ruth

Director Alexander Payne is probably best known for 2004’s Sideways if not for 2013’s Oscar-hopeful Nebraska, but he should be known as one of American cinema’s greatest dark-comedy directors. 1996’s Citizen Ruth is Payne’s directorial debut.

Starring national treasure Laura Dern, Citizen Ruth brings audiences a wildly ahead-of-its-time story about abortion in the U.S. Dern plays Ruth Stoops, a homeless addict who’s pulled between two groups of “saviors” – and their strong positions on whether or not she should see her pregnancy to term.

However, we’ve not given an emotionally exploitative after-school special, but instead a hilariously real & raw unpacking of women’s rights issues in the U.S. Not only did Citizen Ruth lay the foundation for the Payne style & execution, but it also gave audiences a real look at an overly generalized issue during one of its most focused time periods.

Jackass: The Movie

Nearly two decades before Eric Andre’s Bad Trip, the quintessential real-life prank & stunt movie of the twentieth century hit theatres in 2002 with Jackass: The Movie

The film gave audiences one of the wildest theater-going experiences of their lives, as movie houses erupted with gasps, groans, and gut-busting laughs in what was nothing short of a pop-culture phenomena when Jackass: The Movie dropped.

One of the most successful Paramount movies on the streaming service, Jackass: The Movie has many sequels (and one in the works right now), but there’s nothing like the original – everyone’s young, dumb, and ready for fun.

Existenz

After a year in which so many stayed constantly plugged in, stuck inside amid COVID-19 lockdowns, there’s never been a better time to watch 1999’s Existenz. While The Matrix blew audiences away with iconic visuals presenting the idea of living in a simulation, the same year Existenz showed filmgoers the same idea in a very different way.

Existenz tells the story of a video game that plugs directly into your body, and brings users into a virtual reality dream-state in a not-so-distant future. 

We see what happens when we meld technology we don’t understand with our living bodies, among other heady theses in the wild ride of Existenz making us feel like we’re right in the game with Jude Law, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Willam Dafoe and the rest of the film’s stellar cast. 

Existenz proves itself to be one of director David Chronenberg’s most underrated works, and one of the best Paramount movies on plus.

Sunset Boulevard

Sunset Boulevard is one of American cinema’s great masterpieces, and one of the best Paramount movies on its new streaming service.

Sunset Boulevard is one of film’s quintessential noirs, directed by one of the golden age of Hollywood’s most celebrated directors Billy Wilder. 

Still awake? Don’t let the film class talk turn you away. Sunset Boulevard is one of the 1950s most accessible features; the movie doesn’t feel old, and you’ll be drawn in with the first scene showing us a dead body floating in a pool (eat your heart out, crime series of the week).

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