HomeOur ObsessionsBeautiful Life: Everything great about ‘Everything Sucks”s 90s soundtrack

Beautiful Life: Everything great about ‘Everything Sucks”s 90s soundtrack

Bad news, folks. 'Everything Sucks' has been cancelled after just one season, thus proving everything really does suck. The 90s-set coming-of-age Netflix dramedy hailed from writers Ben York Jones & Michael Mohan premiered to mixed reviews.

Beautiful Life: Everything great about ‘Everything Sucks”s 90s soundtrack

Bad news, folks. Everything Sucks has been cancelled after just one season, thus proving everything really does suck. The 90s-set coming-of-age Netflix dramedy hailed from writers Ben York Jones & Michael Mohan premiered to mixed reviews. Reminiscent of NBC’s Freaks and Geeks, Everything Sucks followed two groups of high school misfits – an audiovisual club and a drama club – as they collide in 1996 Oregon.

For those on the favorable side of the review pool (us included), the show was a charming throwback to an era that echoed many of our childhoods and one of the best ways it ignited nostalgia was via its 90s soundtrack. Comprising iconic grunge songs and pop hit earworms, the show was a seriously tuneful trip down memory lane for millennials and Gen Xers alike. In homage to this short-lived show, here are the most raging tracks featured on the Everything Sucks soundtrack (all of which you can find on Spotify):

Oasis – “Don’t Look Back in Anger” (1996)

As the most iconic band of the Britpop era, it’s no surprise Oasis features a fair few times in the show – high-school freshman Luke O’Neil (Jahi Di’Allo Winston) even recreates Oasis’s music video for “Wonderwall” in a bid to ask out his love interest, Kate Messner (Peyton Kennedy). However, the first Oasis song is “Don’t Look Back in Anger”, featured in the opening episode.

The Cardigans – “Lovefool” (1996)

This belter from The Cardigans was (and still is) an absolute tuuuune, so it’s no surprise the gangs played it at their post-premiere party for the sci-fi flick entitled “Intergalactic Lust”.

Duran, Duran – “Ordinary World” (1993)

Ah, Duran Duran – is there any 90s teen who didn’t fawn over John Taylor and his relentlessly gorgeous New Romantical face? Using one of the slower pieces from the DD canon, Everything Sucks plays “Ordinary World” when Kate and Emaline (Sydney Sweeney) finally kiss during the season one finale. Young love!

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones – “The Impression That I Get” (1997)

This catchy little ska punk number from The Mighty Mighty Bosstones was by far the most popular from their 1997 studio album “Let’s Face It”. It’s also the very first song played on Everything Sucks, giving great energy to the show’s opener.

Weezer – “Pink Triangle” (1996)

The show’s creators were right to throw a Weezer track into the mix, and this early song from the band’s “Pinkerton” album is the perfect musical accompaniment to the moment Kate comes out to Luke in episode four.

Deep Blue Something – “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1993)

As one of those decade-defining songs, “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” is also super upbeat, which is probably why the showrunners decided to feature it during the scene in which Mr. Messner (Patch Darragh) dances as he puts away his shopping. The dude’s got some interesting moves.

Blues Traveler – “Run-Around” (1994)

Early on in the show, Kate battles to have a regular school life as her dad (Mr. Messner) also happens to be the Principal. Blues Traveler’s 90s tune plays in the first episode in which she asks her dad to treat her like every other kid at the school.

Ace of Base – “Beautiful Life” (1995)

Normally this song is the sign of a good night, but in Everything Sucks the cassette tape of this track signals the start of a longass drive (not that the kids mind – they’re too busy jamming out.)

SpaceHog – “In the Meantime” (1995)

This one-hit wonder from the Bowie-influenced SpaceHog features close to the end of the first (and now only) season of Everything Sucks, in which Luke’s family sitch takes a rather complicated albeit heartwarming turn.

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Daisy Webb is an outspoken, opinionated writer with a passion for all things horror and cult comedy. When she's not watching films, she likes listening to music, cooking too much food, and writing short stories with unhappy endings.

daisyp@filmdaily.co